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of cairo. today's protest are not that high emotions remain raw in prepation of morsi. top judges are calling itun precedent they are calling morsi the modern day favor and fearing that he would be a dictator. i am uma live in washington. america's news head quarters starts right now. in response to the opposition in the streets was cairo. the muslim brotherhood is calling for a protest in cairo. they are joining with the latest on the developing story. steve. uma right now we are looking at what could be a show down between morsi and the country's judges here in cairo and others in the country. they say they will sphop work until the new president repeals his thursday decree that gave him the power to issue laws without oversight ask chance of them being over turned by the courts. the judges say he's trying to put himself above the law. it will be interesting to see whether all legal prosecutions come to a halt. numbers are fall down today. and numbers large yesterday about 40,000 at their peek and the protest turned violent. one police car set on fire. and protestors are hurling
happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waiting for as far as the demonstrations, when pro and anti-people on the ground will try and march. we'll get a gauge of their numbers to see how strong they are. right now opposition figures say they will be no dialogue with the egyptian president until he revokes the decree. >> gregg: give us a sense of the number
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
hours before in cairo. what we think, then, transpired in benghazi is the extremist elements came to the consulate, as this was unfolding. >> notice the phrase "extremist elements." we since learned that ambassador rice was speaking to talking points, regarding jihadist groups, including a local al-qaeda affiliate. the intelligence community was said to have made the edit. michael morrell told senators the fbi was responsible. then later, cia officials contacted the senators and said the acting director misspoke, and it was actually the cia that changed the talking points. as we said last night, it is a bit of a mess and a real headache for president obama who defended susan rice today but did not mention libya. >> all right, guys, thank you. we want to get back to work. >> mr. president, can you care to -- >> thank you so much, guys. >> can you tell us about that? >> susan rice is extraordinary. couldn't be prouder of the job that she has done. >> here to talk about it, the former cia officer, he is a senior fellow at the defense of democracies, also joining us, national security
, initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo. what we think transpired in benghazi, opportunistic extremist elements came to the consulate as this was unfolding. >> notice the phrase extremist elements. we since learned that ambassador rice was speaking from talking points edited to remove any names to any hey jihadist dproupz, including an al qaeda affiliate. david petraeus said the intelligence community made the edit. yesterday while accompanying ambassador rice on the hill, michael morrell said the fbi was responsible and then the cia contacted senators and said the acting director misspoke and it was actually the cia who changed the talking points. we said last night, it's a bit of a mess and a real change for president obama who defended susan rice today, but did not mention libya. >> guys, thank you. we want to get back to work. thank you so much, guys. >> any talk on that at all? >> susan rice is extraordinary. couldn't be prouder of the job she has done for the u.s.. >> here to talk about it the former cia officer raul gerecht and also joining u
and cairo. issues leading the east asia summit that president obama is an app. the death toll in the gaza strip surpassed 100 on monday. with evidence that an egyptian a truce is in the side. ben rose, the deputy national security adviser for strategic administration at the white house says clinton and obama have been talking about this threat to the trip. -- throughout the trip. they discussed the way forward. they concluded the best way to the dance discussions with leaders is for secretary clinton to take this trip beginning with our close partner, israel. and clinton's middle east talks do not include hamas leaders. they say the secretary will not meet with hamas, that states does not recognize diplomatically. clinton cut short her stay at the east asia summit to take this trip. headline in the "baltimore sun" -- middle east conflict puts the united states in a bind. israel risks other goals across the region. by all accounts, the damage to united states influence in the area is likely to grow if israel sends ground troops into gauze and, as it is threaded to do to stop hamas from fir
undercity published by random house. and robert a cairo. "passage of power." and the late anthony. "house of stone" a memoir of home, family, and middle east published by mid land park. the weapon -- winner of the 2012 national book award for non-fiction describes a world that couldn't be any more difficult from the world that we're enjoying here tonight. yesterday it's a world that our world depends entirely upon. the subject of this book have been patronized and are manhattan sized, and eagerly egg neared in previous work. in this book, they appear in all of their complexity. the villain and sometimes villains along with the types heroes. the -- behind the bock reminds us all that good listening is an ethical act. stylistically, this book pretty much invents a new genre of non-fiction writing because the author rivals the great novelists in developing characters and plotting various narratives that intersect, and setting up surprises and creating tension. the winner of the 2012 non-fiction national book award is katherine. "behind the beautiful forever, life, death, and hope in mum boy
but celebrating it. while secretary of state clinton is in cairo trying to negotiate a cease-fire between israel and hamas with the help of egypt she is closely monitoring reports from tel aviv and in constant contact with prime minister benjamin netanyahu's team. we have word this morning of a deadly attack in benghazi, libya. the chief of police has been assassinated overnight. three unidentified gunmen have targeted colonel outside of his home in a drive-by shooting. he was transported to a medical facility and reportedly died en route. he was appointed the head of security after the september 11th attack on our consulate there. bbc reports more than a dozen security officers have been killed in the eastern libyan city so far this year. we'll have more stephanie after the break. you're always welcome to join us in chat online. go to current.com/stephaniemiller. we'll see you after the break. now? you know the kind of guys who do like reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all of the time now. >> she g
employee keeping the office open. and when something really big happens in cairo, when something really big happens in mexico city, in beijing, in hong kong, what you do is you ship in one of the star correspondents, or even an anchor. but the difference between covering the news, year after year after year in a country, maybe even learning the language, certainly getting to know the people, getting to know who the movers and shakers are, and what the political dynamic in that country is, that really is not happening much anymore. and parenthetically, what's happening in our business is also happening over in the intelligence field, at the cia. where quite literally -- >> i don't want to go too far there. we're -- i want to talk to you about the role of cable television. which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you've derided ideological coverage of the news, bad for america, you said, making it difficult if not impossible for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote an op-ed piece, this is not good for the republic. what do
on the mississippi river are going to be so shallow between st. louis, missouri, and cairo, illinois, and then on top of that because of rock tentacles between red tower and theebs, illinois, that river traffic may come to a halt on the mississippi river. and that means there's going to be millions of tons of commodities that are not going to be able to be transported north and south on that river. and of course that affects not only the recipients of those commodities, and the shippers of those commodities, but in directly -- indirectly people who mine, make, manufacture, supply those commodities. and so this potentially can have a dramatic impact and negative way on the economy of our country at a time when we are trying to stimulate the economy, create more jobs, and make sure that we do not throw ourselves back into a recession. now, in november, early november, and even toward the end of october, over 15 united states senators, around 65 members of the house of representatives, five or six governors of various states have written letters to president barack obama, major philip may, regional admi
obama has tried to do and in his famous speech in cairo is that he wants to deal with these countries and talk to the electorate. now we have an entirely different landscape, but in egypt, libya, and tunisia. relationship with these countries, these are countries with democratic governments. some of them have chosen paths that are a little more moderate, some leaning a little bit more to the fundamentalist side, but they're still fundamentally democratic and that will be a big challenge for the obama administration. host: its next for egypt? -- what is next for egypt? ?uest: in terms of ta host: the obama administration. guest: they still need to establish some of the legitimate government there. after the incredibly uplifting movements in it to rear square, it has devolved into a long protracted -- tahrir square, it has devloved. there is still no clear internal structure. it is enforcing the new governing structure and egypt has not really begun to speak out. this is a populous and important nation. there really have not since, since mubarak left office. the administration is workin
think the last meeting that took place in cairo regarding syria i think was the first meeting after the elections, the american elections, and i think it was an interesting development this because you had a gulf states, and with europeans and with the united states, these are starting to say, all right, think of a strategy to help the addition of syria, and if the lip service is not good enough, they need help in a substantial way. arming is now on the table, de facto whether it's pronounced or not, and it's not a problem, the arabs do that. the saudis will not, the qat it ars, and nobody's talking about american troops on the ground there. this is one most important development and why is it your important? because it is really now in terms of how will it be taken forward with russia and china? will there be confrontation? the question that's going to be asked and needs to be asked is because strategy is needed is to go to the russians and say basically, now what do you want? the president is there for four more years, no more elections, what is it that you want? deliver what the
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12

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